The origin of Aladdin's sword

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Postby Ulrich von L...n » 07 Sep 2014 06:55

Good point about the depiction of the idea of a sword.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... x_arms.png

On coat of arms sometimes quite realistic swords are depicted, sometimes "ideas".

Realistic versions (random sampling) on Hungarian coat of arms:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... B3.svg.png
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... ny_COA.jpg

A strange variant (simultaneous appearance of a ~ realistic sword and a fantasy one):
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 1s_COA.jpg
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Re: The origin of Aladdin's sword

Postby swordflasher » 09 Sep 2014 00:19

'Sinbad sword' in google images brings up the same sort of scimitars.

I do think it's an interesting question you posed, why Arab swords in particular have this universal yet seemingly unhistorical look here in the West..
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Postby Ulrich von L...n » 03 Oct 2014 07:17

It is really interesting that we have a significant amount of historical manuals: Gunterrodt (1579), Marcelli (1686) - just to name a few - showing fencers with Aladdin's (Sinbad's) swords.

Let me share the latest find, from Hundt (1611), posted by a Hungarian guy, who is reconstructing the 17th century sabre fencing.

http://wiktenauer.com/images/thumb/d/d4 ... dt_096.jpg

The same sabre is shown in the next image, with a parrying ring on the opposite side of the grip.
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Re: The origin of Aladdin's sword

Postby Mink » 15 Oct 2014 20:27

Perhaps you already know, but such swords are also depicted in Narvaez, starting here, and in Mendoza y Quixada (at the top, barely visible here, couldn't find a better image).

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Postby Ulrich von L...n » 16 Oct 2014 07:15

Vincent,
Thank you very much for this lead.

It is a very good example that a seemingly "pointless" topic could provide people with a valuable lead in their research (reconstruction of the 17th century sabre fencing). I have already contacted the Hungarian guy who is working on that project.

Also other people were (or still are) interested to know "if anyone has translated or is working on Luis Pacheco de Narváez's "Rapier against Turk sabre" section?" This question was asked on behalf of Bartosz Sienawski in 2013 on FB.
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Re: The origin of Aladdin's sword

Postby Mink » 16 Oct 2014 07:46

There is a partial translation and some analysis in the catalogue of the Noble Art of the Sword exposition:
Masters of Fear or Masters of Arms?Jeronimo de Carranza, Luis Pacheco de Narvaez and the Martial Arts Treatises of Renaissance Spain, by Noel Fallows, pp. 218-235

A book well worth having :) I'd have to reread this part, I don't remember if it goes into many details on the use of the falchion beyond powerful downwards strikes.

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