a question about longsword cross section

Open to public view.

a question about longsword cross section

Postby Brokolice » 05 Feb 2014 20:21

hello

I am new to the forum, I think this is a good place for my questions :)

what do you think is the most versatile type of cross section in a longsword?

I am wondering is it really that much a of difference between cutting and thrusting capabilities of a diamond cross section as opposted to the longsword with a fuller through the whole length/ fuller to the 2/3 of the blade?

I mean, the diamond section sword is great at thrusting (good against armor/ gaps in armor) but worse at cutting, but you wouldn't use cutting against armored opponent anyway, so why isn't it sufficient enough when cutting into unarmored opponents?

thank you for the answer anyone :)
Brokolice
Recruit in training
 
Posts: 5
Joined: 05 Feb 2014 09:19

Re: a question about longsword cross section

Postby admin » 06 Feb 2014 14:29

Welcome to the forum :)

All longsword edges are a wedge-section. The sharp edge bisects/slices and then the wedge behind widens the path into the target until the widest point. So in that sense, all edges are pretty much the same – differing only in the gradient (ie. The angle between the faces of the wedge). This gradient is also changed by impacting the target at different angles – for example at 70 degrees instead of 90 degrees means that the angle of the wedge is effectively reduced, but the distance to the widest point is increased. Like walking diagonally up a hill instead of straight up the hill.

To my mind, the only real difference in cutting between the diamond-section and the fullered-section (of equal edge gradients), is in friction after entry: Once the edge has entered the target and reached the widest part of the blade, travelling through the target will encounter friction with that target and a diamond section will behave differently to a fullered section.

However, in reality the diamond and fullered blades often do not have equal edge gradients. The fullered blade means you can keep the weight the same and pile more steel at the edge – this means a larger edge angle, but a stronger cutting section for equal weight. The diamond section, for equal weight, will have a smaller edge angle, but will take longer to reach the widest point of the blade. So in theory, I think, the fullered blade encountered more friction entering at first and then very little afterwards, whereas the diamond section enters more easily but then encounters more friction later.

Interested to see what others say though!
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

I like swords more than you.
User avatar
admin
Emperor
 
Posts: 35093
Joined: 13 Mar 2006 17:28
Location: Guildford, Surrey, England.

Re: a question about longsword cross section

Postby Brokolice » 06 Feb 2014 16:30

admin wrote:Welcome to the forum :)

....
Interested to see what others say though!


thank you for a welcome and for the answer
I am interested in the opinions of others too, so let's hope someone else answer's my question as well :roll: :D
Brokolice
Recruit in training
 
Posts: 5
Joined: 05 Feb 2014 09:19

Re: a question about longsword cross section

Postby Herbert » 23 Feb 2014 15:59

Matt is of course right with what he wrote.
In the end, ease of cutting (given that the person knows what he/she does) boils down to four things:
• sharpness of the edge
• angle of the edge, meaning the edge section of the blade, what Matt described
• thickness of the blade
• "drag" of the blade

Matt covered pretty much the last three things.
Remains the question how sharp your edge is.

Basically every swordsman has to face a much tougher question: what do you expect from your blade.
If it is extremely well at cutting, it will be quite sensitive to damage - sharp but won't stand up to abuse
If it is extremely good at dealing with whatever you might encounter in a fight, it won't be very sharp.
A good analogy is a kitchen knife and an axe. Both can be sharp but in the end, the kitchen knife cuts better but the axe will stand to heavier use.

Both can be achieved with a fullered blade or a diamond cross section.
The difference between them is not so much the ease of cutting but the stiffness.

Just a few thoughts.

Herbert
User avatar
Herbert
Lieutenant Colonel
 
Posts: 1024
Joined: 10 Aug 2006 09:40
Location: Austria

Re: a question about longsword cross section

Postby Brokolice » 25 Feb 2014 18:09

thank you for the answer :)

I guess the diamond cross section swords are stiffer right? :)
Brokolice
Recruit in training
 
Posts: 5
Joined: 05 Feb 2014 09:19

Re: a question about longsword cross section

Postby Herbert » 25 Feb 2014 19:39

Brokolice wrote:I guess the diamond cross section swords are stiffer right? :)

Exactly, they usually are.
User avatar
Herbert
Lieutenant Colonel
 
Posts: 1024
Joined: 10 Aug 2006 09:40
Location: Austria


Return to Arms & Armour, History, Militaria, Archaeology, Art

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests