Who is your favorite Fight Master???

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Who is your favorite Fight Master???

Postby Bill » 17 Dec 2007 15:54

Ok, because I like lively discussion and this section has been quite too long. I know that this thread will be entertaining and insightful, but lets try to not turn this into a my Master is better than your Master type thing, I dont want to convince anyone that who I like is better(even though it is clearly Meyer :shock: :D ) and I don't want anyone trying to convince me that theirs is better.

SO: Who is you favorite fight Master and why? :twisted:

Mine is Meyer, because it seems that his book is the most in depth and complete as far as a fighting system goes. Especially the translation from Dr. Forgeng. The other translations I have found seem to either stop at Longpoint in the explanation of How to fence from the guards, or are otherwise incomplete or incorrect.

The 3rd book in the Longsword section is very insightful and to me,explains somethings that I cant find in some of the other manuals.


Cheers,
Bill

P.S. lets keep it civil, as I really am interested in other opinions.
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Re: Who is your favorite Fight Master???

Postby David Welch » 18 Dec 2007 01:51

Bill wrote: P.S. lets keep it civil, as I really am interested in other opinions.


Well, I was going to start with a catalogue of all your faults I could think of, and then progress to my point but now I'll just get on with it. :lol:

I like Meyer. I really do. But I believe Doebringer is my favorite. Close to the source and all that.

I realize you didn't ask for this, but I am going to give it to you anyway and tell you why it isn't Meyer.

Meyer is the best technical teaching manual there is. But, there is no "Meyer style". "The Art of Combat" seems to me to be instructions for someone that intends to eventually be an instructor. It is comprehensive. Meyer doesn't say "This is how I fight", he says "Here is everything I can find".

A good boxer only uses a couple of bread and butter techniques that he becomes very, very good at. That doesn't mean that is all he knows, but he will have a good hook, a good jab, and a good straight. What he won't do is learn how to throw every style of hook, jab and straight.

So to put a point on it, I believe Meyer is more like an encyclopedia. It is invaluable in clarifying other works. But if someone asked you what your favorite book was, you wouldn't say that this was it.
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Postby Harry » 18 Dec 2007 17:51

ringeck, because it the dreynschlag-house book. I learnt it, loved it, taught it.
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Postby Pili-pala » 18 Dec 2007 21:14

Not to be playing to the house crowd, but I genuinely like Fiore for his use of basic principles, although this has also lead to brief flirtations with Silver from time to time.
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Postby Carletto » 18 Dec 2007 23:40

I know what is my favourite fencing book, not what is my favourite fight master. First of all, I know the book but never saw the master, secondly, there are those who tell me the name on the book is not the author's but the editor's.
Meanwhile, the book entitled "the art of defence on foot" by Charles C. Roworth is my favourite because it's clear, doesn't take a definitive position on technical matters, so leaves the door open. Also it is so well written that it explains things retroactively, I find it easier to study older cut and thrust forms after reading it than before.

Possibly, I am one of those who think fencing is a problem to solve
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Re: Who is your favorite Fight Master???

Postby AdamR » 19 Dec 2007 00:56

Bill wrote:#snip# or are otherwise incomplete or incorrect.


:!: :!: :shock: :shock: :!:
:?:

Incorrect?

Wow - that's a bold statement - but please - let's not elucidate on it

:)
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Postby admin » 19 Dec 2007 13:47

Fiore dei Liberi's Fior di Battaglia.
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

I like swords more than you.
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Postby Monster Zero » 19 Dec 2007 17:17

Deceased: Fiore

Living: Dan Inosanto
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MC-Stats (Won/Lost/Fought/Open: 1/4/5/?)
Mostly Harmless...
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Postby Cutlery Penguin » 19 Dec 2007 18:29

I have a fondness for Silver that comes from having studied him for such a long time, but I realise that what I do is certainly not pure Silver in the agreed sense. I tend to be a lot more in your face and aggressive than most others.

I.33 is without a doubt my favourite manuscript but that is because I spent many happy hours pouring over the original and it truly is a wonderful thing.

I also have a soft spot for Fairbairn. I know his stuff is probably too modern to be classed as HEMA and it has heavy oriental influences but I like his down-to-earth approach to combat.

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Last edited by Cutlery Penguin on 19 Dec 2007 18:38, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Who is your favorite Fight Master???

Postby Bill » 19 Dec 2007 18:36

AdamR wrote:
Bill wrote:#snip# or are otherwise incomplete or incorrect.


:!: :!: :shock: :shock: :!:
:?:

Incorrect?

Wow - that's a bold statement - but please - let's not elucidate on it

:)


I meant in the transcription or translation, not the Master. :?
I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. ukn

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Postby Bill » 19 Dec 2007 18:38

Carletto wrote: First of all, I know the book but never saw the master,


Really you look much older :shock:
I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. ukn

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Re: Who is your favorite Fight Master???

Postby Bill » 19 Dec 2007 21:52

David Welch wrote:
Meyer is the best technical teaching manual there is. But, there is no "Meyer style". "The Art of Combat" seems to me to be instructions for someone that intends to eventually be an instructor. It is comprehensive. Meyer doesn't say "This is how I fight", he says "Here is everything I can find".


Well in the forward of Meyer, he says he is writing his book for students of the sword, and because the art of fighting has never been written down in a clear manner(Meyers thought not mine:D). So, I don't think it is a manual for being a teacher,as much as a book written for in depth study.
As far as the "here is everything I can find" He says that everything he has written can not be used in every fight, but just in case you happen to have the chance here is what to do, sort of thing.
Sure he has a style it is "German"!!! :D
I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. ukn

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Postby admin » 20 Dec 2007 03:21

Is 'German' a style?..
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

I like swords more than you.
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Postby Richard Strey » 20 Dec 2007 08:18

Of course. Haven't you seen the images in the Meyer manual?
Shorts, sandals with socks in them... German for sure. :wink:
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Postby Nikos » 20 Dec 2007 12:26

Capo Ferro has always captured my imagination more than any other, when I was first deciding what I really wanted to plough the most effort and work into I read bucket loads of stuff covering everything upto the 17th century (not really into post 17th century) across so many weapon styles. The layout of the book, the simplicity of the teachings, the shear quality of the artwork, and the direct no nonense approach to fighting, that manual was truly for me, I simply find that Capo Ferro teachings are an incredably efficient and complete system. Another factor I really like was that as I began to teach it, it became obvious that the layout of the manual is actually perfectly laid out, chronologically for teaching newbies.

Of course this doesnt mean that I don't like other masters and books
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Postby Carletto » 20 Dec 2007 18:04

Richard Strey wrote:Of course. Haven't you seen the images in the Meyer manual?
Shorts, sandals with socks in them... German for sure. :wink:


:lol:
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Postby The Salmon Lord » 28 Dec 2007 10:39

Saint Alfred of Hutton.

Not because of any of his manuals as such. For whisper it even Cold Steel has flaws. (Some nasty parries)

But because he was the original at what we do. He was the chap who said "You know what? Old swords are cool. Cooler than this foil malarky. Lets get us some old swords and some old books and have a go."

And he had a very fine tache.
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Postby Alina » 28 Dec 2007 11:04

Aleksandr Pokryshkin.
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And the land where the yew tree grows.
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