How NOT to use a German duelling shield!

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Postby Brewerkel » 22 Oct 2007 20:29

admin wrote:Cuir boulli has to be made from raw hide.


Matt, I have to disagree. Have you shaped and heated raw hide? It is very brittle stuff even without moist heat plasticising the collagens. Have you read John Waterer's "Leather and the Warrior?" Ronald C. Reed's "Ancient Skins and Parchments?" I doubt you would hold that opinion if you had.

Sorry, raw hide has many uses but not for cuir boilli.
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Postby bigdummy » 22 Oct 2007 20:29

I'd read that the closest thing to linden wood in North America was Basswood, which is almost like balsa.
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Postby admin » 22 Oct 2007 20:37

Brewerkel wrote:
admin wrote:Cuir boulli has to be made from raw hide.


Matt, I have to disagree. Have you shaped and heated raw hide? It is very brittle stuff even without moist heat plasticising the collagens. Have you read John Waterer's "Leather and the Warrior?" Ronald C. Reed's "Ancient Skins and Parchments?" I doubt you would hold that opinion if you had.

Sorry, raw hide has many uses but not for cuir boilli.


Fair enough! People have told me that they only got satisfactory results with rawhide, but I don't have any first-hand experience at all. And there seem to be about as many methods for making 'cuir bouilli' as people trying it. :)
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Postby Brewerkel » 22 Oct 2007 20:41

bigdummy wrote:I'd read that the closest thing to linden wood in North America was Basswood, which is almost like balsa.


I've read that too but never in an academic publication like Bruce Hoadley's "Identifying Wood." Funny thing is some yards use the terms whitewood, bass and poplar almost interchangeably although I'm fairly certain it isn't correct.

I'm wish there was a similar English language study of European woods I can get hold of. I know a number of people would like to have a definitive answer on that. Poplar has worked pretty well in my experiments, when carefully selected. It is a bit coarse when split down to 6-9mm thickness. Balsa doesn't work under light canvas, I'll tell you that. Ka-blam! It exploded into raggedy bits. :oops:
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Postby admin » 22 Oct 2007 20:44

:lol:
Poplar seems to have been common for scabbards and arrows. I made a poplar scabbard for my albion poitiers. I works very nicely, though I'm certainly no carpenter.
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Postby Monster Zero » 22 Oct 2007 20:50

Poplar is very good for scabbards as it is a wood that has a very low sap content and thus doesn't react to the metal.

The Japanese shirasaya is always made from poplar as is the saya and tsuka.
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